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Marginal Original

Caballo- Recycled Revolution

Brand new Album from Caballo. 14 tracks, 14 different genres. FREE DL

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To celebrate a decade in front of Latino Resiste, Caballo releases a new album exploring the current Urban Latino fronts, whether it is new approach like the opening track Souvenir, or exploring lesser known genres like Mode up (From San Andres Island) on the second track (Te quiero Para Mi) or even adding a bit of ska to the Urban Latino track (SANSON) Caballo wants this album to be a testimony of what the label and his own trip ahead of it has accomplished on these first 10 years.


As usual on any Caballo album, heavy collaborations conjoint lesser known names with equally leveled creative skills. Mixing party intended lyrics as well as political and social tracks.


A massive addition is the Dancehall track IMMIGRATION LAW with legendary Buju Banton, highlighting eternal struggle of immigrants trying to follow the nomadic path of reaching a better life in a new place faces global and social pressures by not only the actual travel’s dangers but also facing the systematic discrimination imposed by those who are afraid of interact with the newcomers.


Another great collaboration is done with Canadian Rap legend RELIC on Nothing to Spare (and later on another track SOCIALITE)


Global Bass pioneer Feral, and Russian basshead Chuck Upbeat are also present on a newer take on Tweet retweet, while Venezuelan bangeristas MEDINA and ALPIRE are present in the album as well, one by producing PUM PUM and the former co-producing Old-school Moombahton Mueve la Patica.


Dave Nada Hermanito’s own RANDIZZLE features Caballo on DURO HP.. a heavy dembow track that becomes a simply a laser bass slayer.


Caballo focuses on bass with the collab with Mr Shammi, and later decides to explore dubstep’s own RIDDIM on Sangre Mestiza, making this the first RIDDIM track exploring Latin-indigenous issues.
The amazing art was done by talented American Artist Hugh D’Andrade responsible for the art of the Anarchist Bookfair.

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Marginal Original

Banze gets Global Nomination for Brazil’s indigenous rights

Well deserved nomination for creating awareness about Amazons & Brazil’s current state of affairs.

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Leopold Nunan is known globally as a performing singer & creative artist who has a strong political viewpoint on what’s going on in the geo-politics of the world, especially in his home country of Brazil. His most recent release ‘Banzé’ via Australian record label Wile Out, has been nominated for best ‘music video’ award at this years LABFF aka Los Angeles Brazilian Film Festival.

The song predicted the issues going on right now in Brazil, with the corruption of the current government in power. There has been a lot of global coverage about the devastating fires that have been burning all throughout the native lands of the Amazon forest, these fires have been growing in size ever since the government took away the land rights from the native people, focused on an anti-environment & anti-indigenous economic policy. At the end of the music video we introduce you to a Brazilian native Anuiá Amarü from the Xingu tribe, who speaks about the resistance against the current president.


We want the world to view ‘Banzé’ as a message of action, for us all to understand what is going on right now in Brazil is not ethical and to create awareness of the devastating fires that are still burning in the Amazon forest. As part of the ‘music video’ nomination “Wile Out” will be hosting a series of ‘Global’ fundraisers in which they are partnering with the Amazon Watch organization.

There will be a handful of events throughout the USA from the 11th – 20th of October with dates locked in the cities of Oakland (11th), Los Angeles (16th), New York (18th) and the LABRFF Award ceremony on the 17th of October.

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Marginal Original

Grupo Bongar + Maga Bo – Macumbadaboa

Impressive collaboration exploring the lesser known Afro-Brazilian genres with an electronic twist

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“Macumbadaboa” unites the ancestral sounds of Grupo Bongar from Pernambuco, Brazil with the electronic and dub elements of Maga Bo, the American/Brazilian DJ/producer based in Rio de Janeiro. The project includes the participation of various well known Pernambuco artists – Isaar, Cláduio Rabeca, Lia de Itamaracá e as Filhas do Baracho, Lu do Coco do Pneu, members from the Xambá terreiro, children from the local community as well as the Malian kora player Adama Keita. The album explores many northeastern Brazilian rhythms such as coco, afoxé and maculelê as well as subtle elements of electronic and dub music.

The songs were recorded in an improvised studio set up by Maga Bo in the Memorial Severina Paraíso da Silva – Mãe Biu, in the terreiro of Xambá in Olinda. The intention was to bring Grupo Bongar into a familiar atmosphere where Guitinho could compose music and lyrics on the spot, inspired by the history of the Xambá community which was represented by all of the photos, antiques and relics that surrounded them in the Memorial.

“The lyrics emerged from observing the pieces that make up the Memorial. The old photos, the utensiles used in the terreiro in the time of Mãe Biu, the old percussion instruments, the maps of Nigeria and Cameroon (where the Xambá folk originated) and the articles of clothing from that time. Finally, everything that reminds us of our history and the history of our people,” explains Guitinho. “The repertoire of this album brings traditional songs for the orixás and the entitiies of Jurema. The original lyrics emerged in the moment, through my observation of the pieces in the Memorial, during the recording.” – Marileide Alves 

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Marginal Original

Costa Gold Pt Funkero – A Queima Roupa (Remix Dom Mariachi)

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Pagodao meets grime.. This remix from Dom Mariachi is pure gold.

Pagode is a Brazilian style of music which originated in Salvador, Brazil, and quickly went down to Rio de Janeiro region, as a subgenre of Samba. Pagode originally meant a celebration with lots of food, music, dance and party.

Apparently, as time has gone by, the term “Pagode” has been degraded by many commercial groups who have played a version of the music full of clichés, and there is now a sense in which the term Pagode means very commercial pop, a negative term and getting now ghetto-appeal.. it is perfect for Marginal-Original!!

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